Scratch

Introduction to Scratch
Scratch is a graphical programming language developed by the Lifelong Kindergarten group at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. In Scratch, you can drag and combine code blocks to make a range of programs, including animations, stories, musical instruments, and games. It’s a bit like the programming equivale...
Scratch accounts
Creating Multiple Scratch Accounts If you are using the online version of Scratch, Scratch accounts can be created for your club members, which will allow them to save their projects online so that they can be accessed from home and school. Projects are also periodically auto-saved when users are logged int...
How can I help the children in my club move over to Scratch 3?
Here are some ideas to help your learners get used to Scratch 3:  1) Download our free poster showing where all the major features are in Scratch 3  2) Use the Scratch team’s 'Getting started' tutorial as a hands-on introduction to Scratch 3 3) Use the built-in Scratch tutorials to give y...
Can I still access an online version of Scratch 2?
The Scratch team at MIT has retired the Scratch 2 online editor, so it’s no longer accessible.  The Scratch 2 offline editor remains available to download at scratch.mit.edu/download/scratch2.
What systems can run the Scratch 3 online editor?
 The minimum hardware requirements for using Scratch online are detailed in the FAQ on the Scratch website. The offline version of Scratch 3 is called Scratch Desktop, and it runs on Window 10, macOS 10.13, or newer Windows or Apple operating systems. Older versions of Scratch are still available to install and...
Using Scratch 3 on a tablet or touchscreen device
Scratch 3 can be used on touchscreen devices such as iPads, Android tablets, and Windows tablets and touchscreen computers.  Dragging blocks to write code works very well with a touchscreen interface and is likely to be easier for younger coders who don’t have good mouse or trackpad skills yet. It’s also a grea...